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Non-Attorney using "J.D." Designation

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quincy

Senior Member
Based upon my experiences dealing with people, I'd say the vast majority of Americans have no clue what a J.D. is and certainly wouldn't associate those letters with an attorney. Most of the time it's too much to even ask someone to read a clearly posted speed limit sign.
Haha. :)

I live and work in an area of universities, colleges and law schools, so I think it makes a difference where someone wants to show off his degree.
 

FlyingRon

Senior Member
Haha. :)

I live and work in an area of universities, colleges and law schools, so I think it makes a difference where someone wants to show off his degree.
I spent years working as a university administrator and with the National Science Foundation. Most times you called someone Doctor because chances are they had a PhD or such and they got pissed if you didn't.
In all the years I had one full professor at Johns Hopkins who had no doctorate who would correct you and just tell you to address him as Professor. One of the best professors I ever had, an ultimate engineer, and holder of dozens of patents, but no initials after his name.

I regularly got articles and proposals to referee addressed "Dear Dr. N----" but most of the time my NSF contact would cross off the typewritten salutation and write "Ron" there.
 

quincy

Senior Member
I spent years working as a university administrator and with the National Science Foundation. Most times you called someone Doctor because chances are they had a PhD or such and they got pissed if you didn't.
In all the years I had one full professor at Johns Hopkins who had no doctorate who would correct you and just tell you to address him as Professor. One of the best professors I ever had, an ultimate engineer, and holder of dozens of patents, but no initials after his name.

I regularly got articles and proposals to referee addressed "Dear Dr. N----" but most of the time my NSF contact would cross off the typewritten salutation and write "Ron" there.
That can certainly be a safe way to operate in some circles. :)
 

HRZ

Senior Member
IN some academic circles holding an earned "doctorate " in anything, even something not relevant, can be important in salary and tenure and advancement issues ..
 

Ohiogal

Queen Bee
I spent years working as a university administrator and with the National Science Foundation. Most times you called someone Doctor because chances are they had a PhD or such and they got pissed if you didn't.
In all the years I had one full professor at Johns Hopkins who had no doctorate who would correct you and just tell you to address him as Professor. One of the best professors I ever had, an ultimate engineer, and holder of dozens of patents, but no initials after his name.

I regularly got articles and proposals to referee addressed "Dear Dr. N----" but most of the time my NSF contact would cross off the typewritten salutation and write "Ron" there.
Ron Nyyye the science guy! Okay new name for you.
 

quincy

Senior Member
I spent years working as a university administrator and with the National Science Foundation. Most times you called someone Doctor because chances are they had a PhD or such and they got pissed if you didn't.
In all the years I had one full professor at Johns Hopkins who had no doctorate who would correct you and just tell you to address him as Professor. One of the best professors I ever had, an ultimate engineer, and holder of dozens of patents, but no initials after his name.

I regularly got articles and proposals to referee addressed "Dear Dr. N----" but most of the time my NSF contact would cross off the typewritten salutation and write "Ron" there.
Some of the brightest and/or most successful people in the US have no degrees - except for the honorary degrees they receive for their achievements.
 

FlyingRon

Senior Member
Some of the brightest and/or most successful people in the US have no degrees - except for the honorary degrees they receive for their achievements.
Yep, but this guy was the only full professor I ever recall that didn't have a Ph.D. or some other doctoral level degree.
 

quincy

Senior Member
Yep, but this guy was the only full professor I ever recall that didn't have a Ph.D. or some other doctoral level degree.
I can't think of any professors I had or know now who do not have two or more advanced degrees - but I know of some courses being taught at the undergrad level in certain fields of study (music, art, theater) that have had non-degreed visiting instructors. These courses tend to be filled rapidly.
 

Taxing Matters

Overtaxed Member
I had a math professor once who despite holding a number of degrees told the class the first day “Call me Paul. I had that name long before the university made me a Professor and it has always worked just fine.” :D
 

quincy

Senior Member
I had a math professor once who despite holding a number of degrees told the class the first day “Call me Paul. I had that name long before the university made me a Professor and it has always worked just fine.” :D
I think I would have liked that professor. :)
 

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