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SSI and Social Security

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steffb503

Member
NY
If a person is on SSI what happens when they reach 62? Are they required to take the SS that they are eligible for?
 

FlyingRon

Senior Member
Yes, a condition of SSI is that you apply for whatever benefits are available to you. If you are eligible for social security retirement (or disability for that matter) benefits, you must take them (even at the 62 early retirement option). SSI is a last resort.
 

LdiJ

Senior Member
NY
If a person is on SSI what happens when they reach 62? Are they required to take the SS that they are eligible for?
Many SSI recipients are receiving a combination of SSDI and SSI benefits if they worked at least 40 quarters before becoming disabled and yes, for those recipients the SSDI portion converts to regular benefits at retirement age.

Those who never earned enough quarters to qualify for SSDI or regular retirement benefits would simply remain on SSI.
 

FlyingRon

Senior Member
Many SSI recipients are receiving a combination of SSDI and SSI benefits if they worked at least 40 quarters before becoming disabled and yes, for those recipients the SSDI portion converts to regular benefits at retirement age.

Those who never earned enough quarters to qualify for SSDI or regular retirement benefits would simply remain on SSI.
It's possible in some circumstances to not qualify for SSDI but still have retirement benefits of some sort coming. As stated, you're expected to use up the other resources before SSI.
 

LdiJ

Senior Member
It's possible in some circumstances to not qualify for SSDI but still have retirement benefits of some sort coming. As stated, you're expected to use up the other resources before SSI.
I thought about that before I posted but I could not come up with any scenario where someone could claim SS retirement benefits and not be eligible to claim some amount of SSDI. Even with claims against spouses, widows or former spouses credits its still possible to claim SSDI.

I do agree however that if there is a scenario where regular retirement benefits can be claimed on someone else's credits that they would have to use up those benefits before SSI kicked in.
 

steffb503

Member
I thought about that before I posted but I could not come up with any scenario where someone could claim SS retirement benefits and not be eligible to claim some amount of SSDI. Even with claims against spouses, widows or former spouses credits its still possible to claim SSDI.

I do agree however that if there is a scenario where regular retirement benefits can be claimed on someone else's credits that they would have to use up those benefits before SSI kicked in.
Yes, a condition of SSI is that you apply for whatever benefits are available to you. If you are eligible for social security retirement (or disability for that matter) benefits, you must take them (even at the 62 early retirement option). SSI is a last resort.
Yes, a condition of SSI is that you apply for whatever benefits are available to you. If you are eligible for social security retirement (or disability for that matter) benefits, you must take them (even at the 62 early retirement option). SSI is a last resort.
So If you take SS at 62 you receive less than if you wait. Does having to take it at 62 mean you would never be able to get the higher amount even at 65?
 

LdiJ

Senior Member
So If you take SS at 62 you receive less than if you wait. Does having to take it at 62 mean you would never be able to get the higher amount even at 65?
I believe that your benefits would not reduce. However, it would be best to confirm that with the SSA.
 

FlyingRon

Senior Member
When you start taking SS retirement has no bearing on medicare. If you're not eligible for it now because of your disability, it becomes available at 65. Even those who put off taking retirement benefits until after they are 65 are still eligible to take medicare at 65.
ts.
Your retirement benefits are indeed less if you start taking them early, however, if you are on SSI you have no choice, and no they will never go up. The only way you might game this is if you qualify for spousal benefits.
 

LdiJ

Senior Member
When you start taking SS retirement has no bearing on medicare. If you're not eligible for it now because of your disability, it becomes available at 65. Even those who put off taking retirement benefits until after they are 65 are still eligible to take medicare at 65.
ts.
Your retirement benefits are indeed less if you start taking them early, however, if you are on SSI you have no choice, and no they will never go up. The only way you might game this is if you qualify for spousal benefits.
Just to make sure that there is no misunderstandings....

Lets say that you are on a combination of SSDI/SSI and it goes like this: Your total benefit is $800.00 a month. $450.00 of that is SSDI and SSI makes up the remainder of $350.00. At age 62 the retirement portion of your benefit is only $350.00 (what flying ron said) however, your total benefit still remains $800.00, because the SSI portion would increase to $450.00. (what I meant when I said that your benefits would not reduce).
 

steffb503

Member
But my Social security benefit will remain at the lower level for life?
Currently without SSi, If I take SS at 62 ai would get $600. If I wait till I am 65 I think it is around $800. But if I wait till 70 I would get $1000. So no matter what I will only ever get the max SSI .
 

LdiJ

Senior Member
But my Social security benefit will remain at the lower level for life?
Currently without SSi, If I take SS at 62 ai would get $600. If I wait till I am 65 I think it is around $800. But if I wait till 70 I would get $1000. So no matter what I will only ever get the max SSI .
Your max will remain your age 62 retirement benefits plus whatever SSI brings you up to the SSI amount. You do not have the option to remain on SSDI/SSI until you are 70.
 

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