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What's my best course of action for dealing with this electrician who hasn't done work he was paid for 8 months ago?

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det0003

Member
Don’t get hung up on the $2000 Either. It doesn’t matter what it costs, the seller is obligated to perform per the contract. It may be twice that by now and with a responsive electrician. The seller would still be liable for paying it. She contracted for certain work to be done, not pay $2000 towards repairs.
Not sure that's correct. The contract specifically states the seller will contribute $2000 to have the work done...
 


det0003

Member
I understand that, but either they were talking about what was legal considering the grandfather or the horrendously underbid the job. You can't rewire a house full of ungrounded circuits for $2K.
It is a pretty small house, but yes I have heard from several people that he probably tried to word the work order vaguely to get by with not re-wiring the whole house, though that's what we said we wanted prior to closing. When I gave the electrician a piece of my mind on the phone, he was like "Oh I give the best prices in town and do the best work. Ask anybody. Or you can go pay a ridiculous amount with one of the big companies around town".

On the other hand, I don't even know if he remembers the house and the work he said he would get done. I do not trust him to be competent in the least and I will not have him work on the house.

Now just to decide on how to approach the seller and what kind of deadline to set. The wording of the contract makes me think I can only get $2000, that she will not pay for the whole house to be re-wired if it's more than that (which as you've indicated, it almost certainly would be).
 

det0003

Member
You have no contract with the electrician and have no claim for a refund from the electrician. The seller contracted and paid for the electrician so if your contract states the work will be done as part of the sale, the seller is obligated to ensure it is done or they are liable to you for the cost to complete the contract.

Don’t get hung up on the $2000 Either. It doesn’t matter what it costs, the seller is obligated to perform per the contract. It may be twice that by now and with a responsive electrician. The seller would still be liable for paying it. She contracted for certain work to be done, not pay $2000 towards repairs.
If this is true, how do I ensure that she will pay for the entire job to be done with a responsive electrician? And that I won't be stuck paying for it myself...
 

justalayman

Senior Member
I understand that, but either they were talking about what was legal considering the grandfather or the horrendously underbid the job. You can't rewire a house full of ungrounded circuits for $2K.
They have some confusion in their scope of work
Electrical issues on grounding 2 wire receptacles. Replace receptacles install GFI receptacles ahead of circuits. All electrical will be in compliance with the City of X Inspection Dept and permitted per City of X Inspection Dept, Receptacles to be 3 wire receptacles with 3 wire conductors. Eliminate all 2 wire receptacles
Material + Labor = $2000
One sentence states they will install gcfi protection on the circuit that has only 2 wire Cable (a legitimate “fix” for an ungrounded receptacle). In another it states receptacles to be 3 wire receptacles with 3 wire conductors. (A better fix but much more expensive).

So the bid itself is quite vague.
 

justalayman

Senior Member
The response to request for repairs addendum (signed by both parties at closing) states the following: "Seller to contribute $2000 (per Company X invoice) at closing for electrical repairs referenced in the initial request for repairs."
Ok, I screwed up.

BUT

There may be some hope.

You need to read everything. From what the contract clause you posted (barring there isn’t somethng modifying it elsewhere), the seller had no business hiring an electrician. It simply says seller will pay $2000 towards electric repairs. (Btw: that means you pick up anything more than that)
Before you do anything make sure you haven’t been credited the $2000 on the balance sheet. The seller paying an electrician is not a credit to you. Make sure the $2000 wasn’t put in escrow.

Once you have an estimate then you can go back asking for the $2000.

Then get an estimate for the work needed.
 
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