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quincy

Senior Member
Um, the states and the feds are prepping college dorms and closed hotels to house positive tests and their contacts.

That's the plan for the next wave that is inevitable when social distancing ends.

FEMA camp is and intentionally loaded, umbrella term. But yeah people are going to be involuntarily placed in closed government facilities.

That's not a secret, that's the plan. Agency semantics isn't going to change anything.

A health condition that puts you and anyone in contact with in a camp is a intefereing with major life activities.

It is a permanent Scarlett C for everyone who has tested positive.
I was reading an in-depth story about Mitch McConnell and the polio he contracted as a child, before Salk’s development of the polio vaccine.

Before a vaccine is developed for Covid-19, I expect the experiences of those with the Coronavirus will mimic McConnell’s experience with polio more than mimic Japanese-American internment camps.

Voluntary isolation, yes. Forced quarantine camps, very probably not.
 


Taxing Matters

Overtaxed Member
We need to acknowledge the possibility of - no vaccine, no treatment let alone cure, of a relapsing endemic disease.
We need to acknowledge that there is a lot we still don't know today about this disease and how successfully we'll be able to treat and/or prevent it in the future. Stating as though it were fact that there will be a huge stigma forever, that internment camps are inevitable, etc., is fear mongering. You don't know the future any better than I do.
 

cbg

I'm a Northern Girl
Oh, for Pete's sake, Xylene. Of all the hysterical conspiracy theories I've ever heard, that takes the gold-plated waffle iron.

Hospitals are overloaded without enough beds for those who need them. There is a HUGE difference between a university donating rooms that are not currently in use to provide a place to care for those who are ill, and an internment camp.

I work for a major university with one of the nation's foremost medical schools and a huge international population. We were among the first to send our students home - as many as we could. There were some who, for financial reasons or because of closed borders, were unable to return home and therefore remain in the dorms. As a result, although we considered donating our dormitories to the city, they were still at-least semi-populated. So we, along with another university in the same city, donated the funds to convert another unused building within the city to a place where the sick could receive care.

No one is being forced into it. No one is being held there against their will. No contacts are being imprisoned there. Give me a freakin' break.
 

quincy

Senior Member
For a look at the history of polio and the history of the 1918 “Spanish flu,” here are links to two sources that are generally considered reliable, the Smithsonian and National Geographic:

Polio: https://amhistory.si.edu/polio/timeline/index.htm

1918 Flu:
https://www.nationalgeographic.com/history/2020/03/how-cities-flattened-curve-1918-spanish-flu-pandemic-coronavirus/

More information on polio and the 1918 flu, and how these were addressed, can be found on those same sites.

People have a natural fear of Covid-19. A still-mysterious contagious virus with no known cure will always be scary. I see no good reason to unreasonably increase this fear with unnecessary speculation. It is best to stick to facts.
 

xylene

Senior Member
The idea that a vaccine is certain is highly speculative. There is no reason to see a vaccine as certain.

We've been at it for over 30 years to make an HIV vaccine. Like HIV, COVID binds to ACE2. That is not promising.

If our plan for next waves is to follow the "S. Korea model" of test-trace, well that involved forced isolation of cases and contacts.

That is what they did in Korea. That's not speculation.
 

quincy

Senior Member
The idea that a vaccine is certain is highly speculative. There is no reason to see a vaccine as certain.

We've been at it for over 30 years to make an HIV vaccine. Like HIV, COVID binds to ACE2. That is not promising.

If our plan for next waves is to follow the "S. Korea model" of test-trace, well that involved forced isolation of cases and contacts.

That is what they did in Korea. That's not speculation.
I understand what you are saying but the idea of “FEMA camps” is speculation.

The information in the National Geographic link I provided earlier may not be accessible to non-subscribers. Here is a link to A&E Television’s History.com, from which you can access information on the 1918 Flu and also information on SARS and the 1957 Flu.

https://www.history.com/topics/world-war-i/1918-flu-pandemic
 

Taxing Matters

Overtaxed Member
That is what they did in Korea. That's not speculation.
But South Korea is not the U.S. South Korea has different laws and legal traditions, different culture, and different priorities than does the U.S. To say that just because some other nation has done something that therefore the U.S. (or any other nation) must follow suit is not logical and certainly not borne out by history.
 

FarmerJ

Senior Member
OP so do you now see a valid reason as to why social media users should NEVER use their real name as user name ? Where I work we used to have a program director who regularly searched employees social media and searched social media by name too in order to find out if they had it and if they wrote any thing that was considered to be disparaging or shed any negative light on the company she would call them out over it. So consider telling your family member to close existing social media and make new user names that exclude real first and last name in user name and set it so only those who have permission to can see it as well as limiting / excluding co workers so no one from work can see it
 

quincy

Senior Member
Here is a nice look at South Korea’s handling of Covid-19 and how it compares to the U.S. response to the virus, written by Gregg A. Brazinsky, professor of history and international affairs at The George Washington University, and published by The Washington Post:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/outlook/2020/04/10/south-korea-is-winning-fight-against-covid-19-us-is-failing/

Differences in the responses between the two countries have to do with, among other factors, the type of relationships the governments have with their country’s private businesses, the speed with which testing was done, and contact tracing of the populace.

U.S. citizens are not fond of government surveillance but certainly the U.S. could have/should have been prepared for rapid and expansive testing. The adversarial relationship our current president has had with business (e.g., GM, 3M) has not been all that helpful.
 

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