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Using pseudonyms on resumes

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quincy

Senior Member
It would help a lot if you learned how to write without making definitive statements. These statements are problematic, especially on a legal forum. And they are invariably wrong.

And your statements were false as written.

Read the questions asked by Mark and see where you are answering questions not asked.
 


LdiJ

Senior Member
I know what LdiJ is trying to say...but using a name on a resume is not the same as failing to give accurate information on the application and related paperwork. Just sayin'
Would you hire someone who gave you a pseudonym (and I am not talking about a nickname for their first name but an actual fake name) on their resume, and then filled out paperwork using a different name?

I would think that in the eyes of most people a nickname is not going to be the same thing as a pseudonym.
 

PayrollHRGuy

Senior Member
If they do things accurately, they get notified pretty quickly that an employee's name and social do not match by the state. Either the state's new hire division or the unemployment compensation people are going to catch it.
I was so with you on this one LdiJ until you wrote this.

Nobody notifies the employer "pretty quickly" if that data is wrong. SSA takes 2 years or more unless a real person or a real SSN holder complains about their number being used. New Hire report will only pop if the SSN happens to be someone that owes child support or is getting UI.
 

LdiJ

Senior Member
I was so with you on this one LdiJ until you wrote this.

Nobody notifies the employer "pretty quickly" if that data is wrong. SSA takes 2 years or more unless a real person or a real SSN holder complains about their number being used. New Hire report will only pop if the SSN happens to be someone that owes child support or is getting UI.
That may be true in your state but I got notifications quickly in mine when I was an employer...and we get notifications quickly here as well.

It does take longer for the SSA to notify, but I have never seen it take two years. I would say 18-20 months if someone was hired in January, and 8-10 months if someone was hired in December.
 

Zigner

Senior Member, Non-Attorney
That may be true in your state but I got notifications quickly in mine when I was an employer...and we get notifications quickly here as well.

It does take longer for the SSA to notify, but I have never seen it take two years. I would say 18-20 months if someone was hired in January, and 8-10 months if someone was hired in December.
Agreed - heck, with e-verify it's pretty much instant.
 

LdiJ

Senior Member
Entertainers do it all the time ;)
Entertainers are expected to use Pseudonyms. However, they are upfront about it. I used a pseudonym of sorts when I got married. I continued to use my maiden name because all of the clients knew me that way and it was easier. However, my paycheck came in my married name and there were no secrets about it at all.
 

quincy

Senior Member
A pseudonym is a false name. I agree my Bob/Robert example was a poor one. But my complaint with LdiJ's statements remains.
 
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Zigner

Senior Member, Non-Attorney
For the record, on the thesaurus site I checked, "pseudonym" and "nickname" can be considered synonymous.
Two examples of "nicknames" that don't seem related to the real name: Sarah/Sally and John/Jack
 

LdiJ

Senior Member
A pseudonym is a false name. I agree my Bob/Robert example was a poor one. But my complaint with LdiJ's statements remain.


(as a note: I am somehow hitting the "like" button at times without really liking a post ... I didn't really like your post LdiJ ;))
That's ok, everybody has the right to their own opinion, which sometimes you tend to forget a little.;)
 

Taxing Matters

Overtaxed Member
At least according to the dictionary a nickname and a pseudonym are not the same thing. I doubt very seriously the OP meant a nickname when he wrote pseudonym.
I agree. Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th Ed., defines the word pseudonym to mean “a fictitious name.” That same dictionary defines fictitious, when used in reference to a name, to mean “false, assumed.” A nick name is not generally a false or assumed name. Most are simply well accepted shortened versions of the person's legal name. For example, if you put “Tom Smith” on a resume most would assume that to be the shortened version of Thomas Smith. The name Tom, when used by a Thomas, is certainly not a false or assumed name.

Thus, while I think that LdiJ was too definitive in some statements, I do agree with the general premise behind them: that in a lot of instances the use of an actual pseudonym (a false or assumed name) would rub an employer the wrong way. They are likely to see it as dishonest. And that could lead to the applicant not getting the job or the employee being fired later if not discovered before hiring. I told the OP as much on another forum.

But that would not be the result in all cases. For example, there are a number of writers, actors, singers, and other creative types who use pseudonyms for their work. Those are the names by which they are known professionally. One of the most famous of these is that the great American author Samuel Clemens is much better known by his pseudonym Mark Twain. I rather think that after he had established himself, if Sam Clemens were to apply for a writing job, the employer would be delighted to see Mark Twain on the resumé. :D

Like much else when considering legal issues, the details matter.
 
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