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Drich504

Member
If you read the message first you will see that I said July 3rd she was texted to come get her stuff... If you look at your phone you can see that it's August 13th that's beyond 30 days also she left way back in May of this year..
 


Zigner

Senior Member, Non-Attorney
You need to give proper notice to your former tenant prior to declaring her property abandoned and disposing of it. Text messages are rarely, if ever, considered to be proper notice in this type of situation.
 

Drich504

Member
If you read the message first you will see that I said July 3rd she was texted to come get her stuff... If you look at your phone you can see that it's August 13th that's beyond 30 days also she left way back in May of this year..
Are you at least a paralegal
 

Drich504

Member
She was not my tenant... This is my house she stayed with me... It's obvious that you can not help me.. you're not reading the messages.. No where in there did it say I was somebody's landlord
 

Zigner

Senior Member, Non-Attorney
She was not my tenant... This is my house she stayed with me... It's obvious that you can not help me.. you're not reading the messages.. No where in there did it say I was somebody's landlord
And THIS is all the more reason that you need to speak with a local landlord/tenant attorney.
 

Gail in Georgia

Senior Member
Look; you want legal advice? Go hire yourself an attorney familiar with Mississippi law.

Otherwise, the members on this forum are going to go by the assumption that yes, this relative had established a tenancy with you even if she wasn't paying rent. It does not appear that your state requires you to store her items for any period of time (as some states do after a tenant vacates leaving items behind). However, to avoid the possibility of being dragged into court and sued over possible claims that you tossed out precious and valuable personal property of hers, the suggestion is to send her via snail mail a notice of what she has left behind (keeping a copy of this for your files) and giving her a deadline to pick this up after which you will legally assume she has abandoned these items and you will then be free to dispose of them as you see fit.

Gail
 

LdiJ

Senior Member
If you read the message first you will see that I said July 3rd she was texted to come get her stuff... If you look at your phone you can see that it's August 13th that's beyond 30 days also she left way back in May of this year..
You don't understand what I am saying...and putting it in a text is not sufficient. You need to mail her a snail mail with delivery reciept.

Example:

This is to officially give you 30 day notice to remove your belonging from my home. If you do not remove them by Midnight September 13th, they will be removed from my home and placed on the curb.
 

Ohiogal

Queen Bee
She was not my tenant... This is my house she stayed with me... It's obvious that you can not help me.. you're not reading the messages.. No where in there did it say I was somebody's landlord
Actually, yes she was your tenant. You don't comprehend the law. Just because you don't claim you were landlord, you were under the law.
 

not2cleverRed

Obvious Observer
She was not my tenant... This is my house she stayed with me... It's obvious that you can not help me.. you're not reading the messages.. No where in there did it say I was somebody's landlord
What's obvious to me is you don't want advice, you only want support for your (erroneous) reasoning that you should be able to dump the stuff already. Well, if you want top chance her suing you and you having to reimburse her for her stuff, go for it.

Personally, I'd like to protect myself from such a legal problem.
1) She lived there 7 months. Even if she never paid a dime to you, that makes her a resident for that period, and you are legally the landlord.
2) Proper notice is not a text message. It is not 20 text messages. Proper notice that you want her stuff out is an old fashioned snail mail letter (certified is nice, but at least keep a copy) informing her that her precious property will be disposed of if she does not retrieve it by x date. 30 days makes you sound reasonable and professional. State a deadline, and stick to it. Attach an inventory, so that it is unambiguous what you consider to be her property. It makes it more difficult for her to say later that she "didn't know" you wanted the stuff out, and makes it more difficult for her to claim that her washing machine is gold plated.
3) Be polite and civil. You have been rude here, and none of us have imposed on your hospitality, so I can only posit that you're even ruder to people with whom you have a legitimate gripe. Seriously: legally, being polite will help you come across as credible.

Look up Miss. Code Ann. §§ 89-7-31, 89-7-35, 89-8-13
 

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