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DSS question

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Just Blue

Senior Member
Patient??? I have complied to all requests. I am a Mother WITHOUT my boys, I can't take them grocery shopping or to the park...I'm missing out on time with them because these people want to listen to my soon to be ex who was in a mental institution at the time of said accusations????
And that is why you need an attorney: https://www.ncbar.gov/

2 month is a short amount of time...this could take another year to come to a conclusion. Call the bar and ask for the names of attorneys that have extensive experience dealing with DSS. You may be able to have one of them represent you pro bono.
 

t74

Member
Most communities have legal services available based on ability to pay or with extended fee payment plans. Check with your local law school's legal clinic in addition to social service agencies.
 

Ohiogal

Queen Bee
Pro bono? REALLY? Everytime someone suggests that I really need to know if the person suggesting would work for free.
 

Just Blue

Senior Member
Pro bono? REALLY? Everytime someone suggests that I really need to know if the person suggesting would work for free.
It's possible. Someone I know had an attorney represent them pro bono. This attorney made it his life's mission to smack down DSS when they (DSS) screwed up.
 

commentator

Senior Member
Don't imagine that the state makes money off putting children in foster care or has some nefarious scheme to keep them away from your family. Usually that family has to be really really unsuitable in many respects for them to totally take the child out of the situation. In my state, which is near yours and has a lot of the same type of policies and problems, there is a great shortage of foster care placements even for the very worst situations. I suspect they're going to try to use your in laws if it seems at all possible and not harmful to the children.

That you "trust your in-laws completely" means they'll do what you want them to including let the children be with you as much as you choose while providing baby minding when you don't choose. I'd suggest that instead of trying to do this silly change of custody without court supervision idea that you work very hard on being the best placement yourself that you can be for the children, and you know exactly what that involves. Your husband cannot tell enough tall stories to have custody taken from you if you yourself are not doing and saying and behaving in some manner that causes the case workers to think he's telling the truth or that you need to lose custody due to some reason you're not telling us.
 

t74

Member
Unfortunately, it sounds like DSS had good reason to become involved. OP, you need to do a lot of soul searching and make the effort to get your own situation stabilized and your life on track. It is too easy to fall back into old habits when the going gets hard. Look at the current situation as a challange to be met and overcome rather than someone being "out to get you". Both you and your children will benefit. You have made a good start if you are indeed acting as you report. Keep it up and your will regain full custody of your children. Use the time you have without that responsibility to improve your job skills so you can provide a better life for you all. I expect the grandparents do not want the responsibility of raising grandchildren as they get older but want the grandchildren to have comfortable lives with successful - both personally and professionally - parents.
 

Ohiogal

Queen Bee
If the cause was close to my heart and the client was righteous...yeah. I would. It can't hurt OP to inquire. ;)
Great so because I love juvenile court, I should volunteer all of my time and not get paid a dime. NO ONE should expect someone to work for them for free. Attorneys have bills to pay as well. OP should HIRE someone to represent her or (if there is an open case) inquire if she might qualify for appointed counsel.
 

Zigner

Senior Member, Non-Attorney
Great so because I love juvenile court, I should volunteer all of my time and not get paid a dime.
No, not "should", but "could".

NO ONE should expect someone to work for them for free.
No, not "expect", but one can ask, very nicely, if they are willing to do so, and not be offended if the answer is no.

There are listings online of pro bono and legal aid clinics in NC that the OP can search for.
 

Just Blue

Senior Member
Great so because I love juvenile court, I should volunteer all of my time and not get paid a dime. NO ONE should expect someone to work for them for free. Attorneys have bills to pay as well. OP should HIRE someone to represent her or (if there is an open case) inquire if she might qualify for appointed counsel.
That's not what I said or even implied. OP MAY be able to find an attorney that MIGHT be willing to assist her pro bono.
 

quincy

Senior Member
Attorneys in large law firms are often required to provide X number of hours a year to pro bono work. The American Bar Association and State Bar Associations recommend that attorneys commit to X number of hours of volunteer service a year.

ABA Model Rule 6.1:

The one CPS case I am most familiar with involved a university professor whose son was (wrongfully) removed from his care by CPS. Several well-known attorneys in the State volunteered their time and their resources to (successfully) help the professor (and his wife) get their son back.
 
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